CVAA Legislative Agenda

 

 

CVAA 2015 Bill List

below are a few of the bills we have taken formal positions on this year.

SB 690 (Stone)  CVAA sponsored bill Support

SB 690 will help protect victims of stalking, domestic violence and sexual assault from their abusers by replacing the narrow, outdated definition of electronic tracking device currently contained in Penal Code Section 637.7 with the broader, more technologically updated definition of tracking device contained in Penal Code Section 1534. Penal Code Section 1534 governs the application and use of tracking device search warrants by law enforcement. Penal Code Section 1534 was specifically enacted to deal with the use of GPS technology and other forms of electronic tracking of both persons and objects in response to a United States Supreme Court decision involving GPS trackers.

 SB 651 (Leyva) CVAA co-sposored bill Support

Existing law provides that a minor who violates a criminal law may be adjudged to be a ward of the court. Existing law generally requires that the minor pay a restitution fine to be deposited into the Restitution Fund and restitution to any victim of his or her conduct. Existing law defines a victim to include the immediate surviving family of the actual victim and governmental entities, as specified.
This bill would expand the definition of victim to include a corporation, estate, or other legal or commercial entity when that entity is a direct victim of a crime. The bill would also expand the definition of victim to include a person who has sustained economic loss as a result of a crime and who satisfies specified conditions.

 

SB 261 (Hancock) oppose

SB 261 will increase the age for juvenile parole consideration from 18 years to 23 years of age.

AB 835 (Gipson) Support

Existing law defines the crime of vehicular manslaughter as the unlawful killing of a human being without malice while driving a vehicle under specified circumstances, including the commission of an unlawful act, not amounting to a felony, with or without gross negligence. Existing law provides that vehicular manslaughter is punishable as a misdemeanor or felony.
Existing law provides various time limits within which crimes may be prosecuted, except as specified. Existing law authorizes, if a person flees the scene of an accident that caused death or permanent, serious injury, a criminal complaint brought pursuant to specified provisions to be filed within one or 3 years after the completion of the offense, as specified, or one year after the person is initially identified by law enforcement as a suspect in the commission of the offense, whichever is later, but in no case later than 6 years after the commission of the offense.
This bill would additionally authorize, if a person flees the scene of an accident, a criminal complaint brought for a violation of specified vehicular manslaughter crimes to be filed either one or 3 years after the commission of the offense, as specified, or one year after the person is initially identified by law enforcement as a suspect in the commission of that offense, whichever is later.

 

 

 

To search for bills on the California Legislative Website click HERE